Project

General

Profile

Support #1231

Percentage of young people living with their parents in England

Added by Louise Luo over 1 year ago. Updated about 1 year ago.

Status:
In Progress
Priority:
Normal
Assignee:
Category:
-
Start date:
08/21/2019
% Done:

50%


Description

Hi,

I found the percentage of young people (aged 20-34 years old in each wave) living with their parents in UKHLS is inconsistent with the percentage in Labour Force Survey.

I used n_npns_dv to derive whether young graduates are living with their parents. I used cross-sectional weight n_indpxub_xw (I also tried longitudinal weight) to adjust the sample. My case study is in England.

I found that the percentage of young people living with their parents rose from 25% in wave 1 to 46% in wave 8. However, in the LFS, this figure was also 25% in 2009 but only 28% in 2018. Not sure if I can do anything to close this 18% gap.

Many thanks.

Louise


Files

Living with parents.do (1.39 KB) Living with parents.do Louise Luo, 08/21/2019 02:44 PM
w1_project_instructions.pdf (2.12 MB) w1_project_instructions.pdf Alita Nandi, 09/02/2019 06:00 PM
#1

Updated by Alita Nandi over 1 year ago

  • Status changed from New to In Progress
  • Private changed from Yes to No

Hi Louise,

We are looking into this issue and will get back to you soon.

Best wishes,
Alita

#2

Updated by Stephanie Auty over 1 year ago

  • % Done changed from 0 to 10
#3

Updated by Louise Luo over 1 year ago

Hi Alita,

I check the figures using longitudinal weight (indpxnub_lw) in a balanced panel today. I found the percentage of young people living with parents dropped from 41% in 2012 to 23% in 2017. This seems to be controversial to that indicated in https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/families/articles/whyaremoreyoungpeoplelivingwiththeirparents/2016-02-22 .

Best,
Louise

#4

Updated by Alita Nandi over 1 year ago

Hello Louise,

Sorry for the delay in getting back to you. Our team has looked at the ONS report you are referring to and our data. Here are some possible reasons for the difference you found:

1) In the ONS table notes, it is mentioned “Once a person either lives with a partner or has a child, they are considered to have formed their own family and are no longer counted as being part of their parents’ family even if they still live in the same household*. Therefore such people are deemed to be not living with their parents here.” -> which leads to the conclusion that LFS figures might underestimate the proportion of young people living with parents as, for example, lone parents (mostly single mothers), or multigenerational households would not be taken into account. So, see if after using the LFS definition of household and applying that to our data, the difference in proportions of 20-34 year olds living with their parents across the two surveys reduces.
*See page 40 of the attached document to see how households are defined in our study

2) Other things to take into consideration from the notes under the tables “Students living in halls of residence during term-time and living with their parents outside term-time are counted as not living with their parents here.” In UKHLS, some young people are enumerated in household grid (indall file) but could indeed live most of the year elsewhere (e.g. in the student halls).

3) There may be differential attrition with young people living with their parents less likely to attrit (when people move the risk of losing contact with them increases).

Hope this helps. If you have further questions or follow-up please let us know.

Best wishes,
Alita

#5

Updated by Louise Luo about 1 year ago

Hi Alita,

Thanks for your reply.

Best wishes,

Louise

Also available in: Atom PDF